Monday, June 2, 2008

Check the Flavor Seal on that Pringle's Can, Folks

Ashes of deceased Pringle's packaging-system inventor buried in one of his own cans. The epitaph on the can is a touching tribute to the ideals of Mr. Bauer: "Cannister contains at least 50% recycled material."

7 comments:

Ash said...

Ok. That clinches it. I'm now always going to check what's in my Pringles can before I reach in, reach up and chew.

Which is good practice anyway.

tizona said...

Reach UP? Are you THAT short, Ash?...LOL.

RebeccaH said...

Wow. I always thought Pringles cans were useful (I use them to keep some of my templates and polymer molds, and rack them in an old wine rack), but even I never thought of using them as an urn. Interesting.

Skeeter said...

Great packaging — pity about the contents. I found their ersatz flavour to be very disappointing.
I don't know how they make them, but they are obviously not potato chips.
But then, we Oz folk are spoilt by these real potato chips.

Paco said...

Skeeter: I have to agree that Pringle's potato chips are pretty ersatz. Paco Enterprises' food subsidiary used a similar packaging apparatus, but since we distributed them via used trucks over secondary roads (to avoid tolls) we had to market them as Paco's Potato Dust. Never really caught on.

Boy on a bike said...

I am completely unable to prove that this is true, but I was once told in a marketing lecture that P&G invested more in rolling out Pringles ($700 million) than Ford invested in the development of the BA Falcon ($500 million).

It's the kind of thing that if you say it with a wise look on your face at a dinner party, no one will call you on it.

Col. Milquetoast said...

I never considered Pringles to be potato chips. Eventually, I realized they had a relationship to potato chips but a distant one. They've always been in a salty class by themselves.

I've always admired the efficiency of the uniform chips and their being stacked neatly in the tube.