Wednesday, April 8, 2009

The Counter-Campaign

The Other McCain has an interesting profile of Republican up-and-comer Paul Ryan, a congressman from Wisconsin. I don’t know whether he’s going to wind up being the Republicans’ best shot in 2012 or not, but I do think it’s important that someone in the GOP, who is obviously presidential timber, begin to run a permanent counter-campaign in opposition to Obama’s permanent presidential campaign. Someone – and I think, realistically, it is going to have to be an elected official, whether governor, representative or senator, with presidential aspirations – needs to go into full-time opposition to Obama, the Democrats and their disastrous policies, across the board, smiting hip and thigh. This person is not only going to have to constantly shout “Stop!”, but is going to have to support conservative principles and offer alternative policy prescriptions (and I’m talking bold ideas, not the “Me-Too-Only-Not-So-Much” shadow of the Democratic program; the bold ideas of the Founders, to be exact).

The risks entailed are great: Obama may hang on to his popularity in spite of economic catastrophe, or the Democrats, working with the MSM, may continue to successfully pin our nation’s problems on Bush, or an increasingly large portion of the electorate may turn into complacent ungulates who let themselves be led into the socialist stockyard only to find, too late, that they have a date with the electric hammer. The Republican contender may not be able to overcome these obstacles. But what if Obama and the Democrats overplay their hand? What if they stumble badly? What if many voters of the uninformed and indifferent persuasion turn out to be amenable to opportunities for instruction – perhaps even eager for it - when their responsibilities as citizens and their rights as free men and women are explained to them in terms that they can relate to their own lives? Wouldn’t we want to have a conservative champion, hardened by the challenges of a permanent counter-campaign, ready to act, to exploit the weaknesses inherent in the Democratic program, someone who can publicly face off against Obama, and not only withstand, but profit by, the comparison? Someone who would be in a position to say, with confidence and authority, “He’s doing it wrong. Let me show you how it’s done.”

6 comments:

bruce said...

Absolutely right. But be prepared to fend off constant accusations of 'racism'.

Even here in Australia where our elected Opposition is expected to do that job, the Govt has closely allied itself with dubious Chinese interests and crying 'racism' is turning into the main response to any criticism, ridiculous as that appears.

richard mcenroe said...

Well, the erudite Boston Thug is back in our defense.

Does this fellow Ryan have an exploratory committee or a PAC yet?

kc said...

Sounds like a terrific idea, Paco, one that I thought might be workable when I first heard of Australia's Opposition. Shadow Government? Betcherass, bring 'em on!

Damon said...

kc's comment reminded me that the US doesn't really have an Executive-level "Opposition".
(I'm sure you guys will correct me if I'm mistaken...)

Here in Oz (and UK, Canada and NZ) the main opposition parties have well-defined "Shadow Cabinets" (e.g. the Opposition Spokesman on Defence, or Finance, or Social Security). These spokesmen generally go on to be the relevant Minister (of that Department) if the Opposition gets elected to Government.
The voting public thus has (usually) a few years to "get to know" the alternative government. Also the alternative Prime Minister is chosen by the Party, not by public election, so has time to develop (and articulate) alternative policies, by constantly "opposing" the Government.

This (the "Shadow Cabinet") is possibly a worthwhile innovation in US politics. An extension of Paco's original post, I know, but worth considering. I realise the Cabinet structure is quite different in the US compared to UK/Oz/NZ/Canada, but something worth thinking about...

Paco said...

I think something like a "Shadow" government would be excellent (although, I suppose, in a non-parliamentary system it would be a little harder to effect).

richard mcenroe said...

What we need is a 'Shadow RNC' to raise and direct funds for candidates actual Republicans like.